Students design, begin new mural

Junior+Lynsi+Copeland+paints+a+mural+in+the+area+five+hallway

Matt Olson

Junior Lynsi Copeland paints a mural in the area five hallway

After two months of discussion and planning, juniors Lynsi Copeland, Lourdes Moreno and Easton Young began painting a mural on the wall leading up to Area Five on Feb. 21. From priming the wall, sketching it out to actually painting it, a lot of work is being put into this project.
“We did the initial drawings on some paper, we outlined it on my graphic design computer, and then we put it on a projector, pulled the projector back enough. So it’s like blown up on the wall. So we knew where we needed to paint where we need to outline and then go from there,” Young said.
Although this project is only just taking off, it has been on the to-do list for several years.
“It’s been in the works for years, since we started the first mural which was back when Mr. O was here and they did the area four mural,” art teacher Eden Quispe said.
Much like the mural outside of Area Six, this mural will feature characters from books assigned throughout the English curriculum such as Fahrenheit 451 and Romeo and Juliet.
“The inspiration behind it would be the curriculum that we’re reading in the English department like throughout the freshman all the way up to the senior years. Like general all the way up to AP courses. It would be all the books that we read and all the projects that we work on,” Young said.
In order to speed the process along, students in Art Club are helping out during clubs and in seminar. Because so few people are available to help paint the mural, it is expected to take about a month to complete.
“There are usually only about three people working on it,” Moreno said. “It’s me, Lynsi, Easton and sometimes just random people in our club.”
Having another mural to brighten up the halls at school is just one of many goals for the impact of this mural.
“I like the idea of departments collaborating together, and being able to think about art as it applies to English and math as well,” Quispe said. “And that it makes students happy when they look at it rather than just seeing a blank wall.”

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